World Health Organisation (WHO) on Monday, announced football legend Didier Drogba from Côte d’Ivoire as its new Goodwill Ambassador for Sport and Health.

Drogba will promote WHO’s top tips on how physical activity can lead to a healthier and happier life, and also highlight the value of sports, particularly for the youth.

The Ivorian striker is best known internationally for his long and record-setting career at Chelsea Football Club, and for having been named African Footballer of the Year in 2006 and 2009.

He is the all-time top scorer and former captain of the Ivory Coast national team.

He also has a long track record off the pitch, of participating in various campaigns to promote healthy lifestyles, anti-malaria campaigns, and HIV prevention and control.

During the announcement of his new role, in Geneva, Drogba said he was honoured to team up with WHO and “support its work to help people reach the highest level of health possible, especially young people in all countries.

“I have benefited first-hand from the power of sports to lead a healthy life and I am committed to working with WHO to share such gains worldwide.”

WHO Director-General, Dr. Tedros Ghebreyesus, hailed Drogba as “a proven champion and game changer both on and off the pitch.”

For Ghebreyesus, the athlete’s support can help curb the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) through the promotion of healthy lifestyles.

“We are pleased to have him playing on our team, and helping communities worldwide reach and score goals through sports for their physical and mental health and well-being,” he said.


According to the WHO chief, Drogba will also support the mobilisation of the international community to “promote sports as an essential means for improving the physical, mental health and social well-being of all people, including in helping COVID-19 recovery efforts.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of physical activity, and WHO says up to five million deaths a year can be averted if the global population is more active.

Current global estimates show four in five adolescents, and one in four adults, do not do enough physical activity.

READ ALSO: Entries open for the N.5 million Ray Ekpu Prize for Investigative Journalism

Globally this is estimated to cost 54 billion dollars in direct healthcare costs, and another 14 billion dollars to lost productivity.

Increased physical inactivity also hurts health systems, the environment, economic development, community well-being, and quality of life.

Regular physical activity helps lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and various types of cancer, including breast cancer and colon cancer.

Drogba’s announcement as a WHO goodwill ambassador was made during a ceremony to launch the Healthy 2022 World Cup – Creating Legacy for Sport and Health.

The initiative is a partnership between Qatar’s Ministry of Public Health and its Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, WHO and world football’s governing body, FIFA, to promote sports during next year’s World Cup in Qatar. (NAN)